The Wedge of the San Rafael

The Wedge of the San Rafael
Someone has to live here, in the middle of desert beauty. Might as well be the Kellys.

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Grapefruit Moon, One Star Shining

Author Anne Gracie gets full credit for this column. She's a Facebook friend (and a writer I admire), and she posted the Tom Waites song with the lovely photo of our current huge worldwide moon. She'd noticed it while coming home from dinner in the city. Anne lives in Australia. The comments that popped up were from all over the world, of course, as we all admired the same moon.

I've been admiring that grapefruit moon from my hemisphere. I was coming home from a booksigning on Saturday. It was still light out, but right after I passed Soldier Summit (at 7,000+ feet the highest point on the trip), I noticed the moon peeking coyly between two mountains. It was pale then and not in charge yet, because the sun as still up, but there it was, ready for an entrance. Made me smile.

I woke up early this morning, because the cat must've pushed open the door, and decided I needed a visit. The cat and I got up because that grapefruit moon was so bright and irresistible - in charge now and hugely visible.

And all over the world, we're watching. Last night, our bookclub commented on "A Christmas Carol," our reading for the month. We also had our Christmas potluck. We do a good one. It's not one of those you-bring-this-and-I'll-bring-that kinds of potlucks, but a true take-your-chance potluck. The carnivores ruled, with several kinds of meat. I made cheese grits and hot sauce - total comfort food - and an angel food, raspberry, powdered sugar, Coolwhip, sour cream thingee.

Then we watched the Gorge C. Scott version of "A Christmas Carol," my personal favorite.

I was thinking about Jacob Marley this morning. When I read Anne Gracie's comment about the full moon, and saw the posts from literally everywhere, I couldn't helping thinking about Marley's "Mankind is my business." With Marley, is a lament, because he never thought about anything except making money. After his death, he learned, to his horror, that mankind should have been his business. Mankind is most emphatically our business; we ignore that to our peril.

There we are, all admiring the same grapefruit moon. We're all involved in this world. Do something nice for someone today, ok?

3 comments:

  1. When we lived in Richfield we had better access to the moon because it elbowed its way into the bedroom window. Here in Provo, we have more street lights that give it competition so we don't see the moon unless we go out at night. Monday we went for the monthly sibling dinner and saw the moon pushing up past the mountains, then disappearing behind them as we went further east. It's always like finding an old friend.

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  2. Carla, I just read--AGAIN--A Christmas Carol and find more and more things to appreciate in Dickens' words as I get older. (I'll be 50 this upcoming year. Yikes!) It's never too late to try to make your corner of the world a better place...not as long as you're still breathing. :-)
    Hey, one more thing, I decided to try a Facebook posting for arthritis relief this morning and mixed two tablespoons of honey and one teaspoon of cinnamon in a cup of hot water. It was fine until I got close to the bottom. Then all your descriptions of water at the bottom of the barrel for those sea bound sailors came to light: Glob City!! Made me love your heroes all the more... Happy New Year, Carla. :-)

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    1. Robin, I don't think I could ever have been one of those iron men in wooden ships. It's more fun to just write about them. Hope the remedy worked. Maybe if you just close you eyes and hold your nose, the way they did!

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